The Santa Fe home uses 80 percent less energy. It includes a 5,000-gallon rainwater collection system, and a solar system that provides hot water and radiant heat.



A new single-family home in Santa Fe, N.M., is working toward the nation’s first home built to platinum status for the U.S. Green Building Council’s Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) program.

Santa Fe-based custom builder Kreger Design Build anticipates its 2,300-square-foot residence will receive the designation. The process can take up to a year from completion. Kreger also expects to receive Gold Certification from Build Green New Mexico.

“We’re proving that homes can be built to very high green standards without sacrificing any of their beauty and comfort,” said architect Bob Kreger in New Mexico Business Weekly. He designed the pueblo-style home.

According to the builder, the home uses 80 percent less energy than a conventional home of the same size. Its features include a 5,000-gallon rainwater collection system, and a solar system that provides hot water and radiant heat.

Though the home is connected to the local utility grid, Kreger believes the solar collectors will produce more electricity than the homeowners will use during certain times of the year. The meter will actually spin backward.

The home will be open to the public Aug. 22-24 as part of the Santa Fe Area Homebuilders Parade of Homes. Visit www.santafehometour.com for details.