Plumbing and Mechanical

AGC Strongly Supports Infrastructure Investments

December 11, 2008

The Associated General Contractors of America (AGC) today launched a new national effort designed to show broad support for needed new infrastructure investments. The effort is designed to make sure that new infrastructure investments help create and preserve construction jobs and serve as a foundation for future economic growth, said Stephen Sandherr, the association’s Chief Executive Officer.

The effort is necessary because the construction sector has been particularly hard hit by the economic challenges facing the nation. More than 770,000 construction workers have lost their jobs over the past two years, Sandherr noted, adding that without new infrastructure investments, countless more construction workers could lose their jobs next year. 

“We want to build a foundation of support for new infrastructure investments that is as strong as it is necessary,” said Sandherr. “These investments will put Americans back to work and make our economy strong for decades to come.”

Sandherr said that investing in new infrastructure would have significant, positive, long-term benefits for the U.S. economy. Cutting congestion, improving education and health care facilities, cleaning water supplies and improving levies will improve America’s ability to compete globally. He added that the economic slowdown has led to declines in construction material prices, meaning taxpayers will get a better deal on investments made next year. 

As part of the campaign, the association has begun a new advertising campaign, new outreach to construction workers, their suppliers and business partners, and new efforts to build support from local and state officials. Over the coming weeks, the association is asking supporters to log onto to www.agc.org/letsbuild and add their names to a petition in support of vital new infrastructure investments that will go to the next Congress and the office of the President-elect.

“We have a unique opportunity to turn our short term economic challenges into long-term economic solutions,” Sandherr said. “It’s hard to imagine anyone objecting to building now for a better future.”